The good news, North American  ports were  not in the  bottom 10 of  global/ worldwide rankings. Only top ten ranking, Port of Baltimore (#10) for  ship size < than 8,000 TEUS(twenty foot equivalent units). Ports of N.Y. and N.J., not in the top ten rankings for the Americas.  

Source:  Journal of Commerce Port Productivity Data and IHS Maritime and Trade

The rankings included in this report are based on seven elements provided by ocean carriers representing more than 75 percent of global capacity. Those data points are: vessel name, terminal name, port city, port country, berth arrival, berth departure and number of moves (including lift-ons, lift-offs and re-stows).

Berth arrival and departure refer to lines down and lines up — that is, the actual arrival and departure of the ship at berth. The calculation of moves per hour between these two times is referred to as unadjusted gross berth productivity.

It’s the same calculation for all 483 terminals and 771 ports the JOC evaluates, allowing for basic apples-to-apples comparison globally. The data enters a data warehouse in standardized format so that it’s accessible for reports, rankings, analysis and other uses.

Interaction with global carriers resulted in data whose definitions are consistent across all carriers. Rankings were determined by analyzing more than 125,000 port calls in 2014.

Productivity is defined as the average of the gross moves per hour for each call recorded in 2014. Gross moves per hour for a single vessel call is defined as the container moves (onload, offload and repositioning) divided by the number of hours the vessel is at berth.

 

 


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